Penn Center for Personalized Diagnostics

The genetic data we compile empowers physicians to take an individualized approach to cancer care, giving them the tools to refine diagnosis, provide better prognostication, and adjust treatment plans accordingly.

Illustration of a DNA helix with different human faces inside it

The Center for Personalized Diagnostics offers physicians the highest volume of genome testing in the region, with more than 4,000 clinical and research samples to date. More research means stronger, actionable results for your patients.

Genomic sequencing reports provided by the CPD are specifically geared toward actionable knowledge for clinicians. The reports focus on normal or abnormal gene information and provide interpretation, comments, and references for disease-associated mutations or variants of uncertain significance.

Learn more about the benefits of ordering a personalized diagnostic test, the different gene panels CPD offers analysis for, and how to request a test for your patient today.

How to Order a Test

Physicians at Penn Medicine

  • All inpatient orders require completion of a paper requisition form. Please submit the completed form with both blood and bone marrow specimens, or fax a copy of the requisition to 215-614-1988 or 215-898-9817 for all other requests.
  • All outpatient requests are available in EPIC as a special studies request on an AP consult orderable. After placing the order, a copy of the requisition must be printed and faxed to either 215-614-1988 or 215-898-9817.
  • For all requests, a qualified Pathologist will review the submitted or available material to ensure there is adequate tumor present.
  • Appropriate and adequate samples will be routed to the CPD for DNA extraction and NGS testing, with results to be returned within 14-21 days.

Physicians Outside of Penn Medicine

Physicians outside the University of Pennsylvania Health Care System who are interested in the services of the CPD can contact the Laboratory directly.

Common ICD-10 Codes

HEMATOLOGIC MALIGNANCY CODES
ICD-10 DIAGNOSIS
C95.00 ACUTE LEUKEMIA OF UNSPECIFIED CELL TYPE NOT HAVING ACHIEVED REMISSION
C91.00 ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA NOT HAVING ACHIEVED REMISSION
C92.50 ACUTE MYELOMONOCYTIC LEUKEMIA, NOT HAVING ACHIEVED REMISSION
C92.00 ACUTE MYELOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA, NOT HAVING ACHIEVED REMISSION
C92.40 ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA, NOT HAVING ACHIEVED REMISSION
C91.10 CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA OF B-CELL TYPE NOT HAVING ACHIEVED REMISSION
C92.10 CHRONIC MYELOID LEUKEMIA, BCR/ABL-POSITIVE, NOT HAVING ACHIEVED REMISSION
C93.10 CHRONIC MYELOMONOCYTIC LEUKEMIA NOT HAVING ACHIEVED REMISSION
C85.80 OTHER SPECIFIED TYPES OF NON-HODGKIN LYMPHOMA, UNSPECIFIED SITE
C90.00 MULTIPLE MYELOMA NOT HAVING ACHIEVED REMISSION
SOLID TUMOR CODES
ICD-10 DIAGNOSIS
C34.90 MALIGNANT NEOPLASM OF UNSPECIFIED PART OF UNSPECIFIED BRONCHUS OR LUNG
C71.9 MALIGNANT NEOPLASM OF BRAIN, UNSPECIFIED
C43.9 MALIGNANT MELANOMA OF SKIN, UNSPECIFIED
C18.9 MALIGNANT NEOPLASM OF COLON, UNSPECIFIED
C50.919 MALIGNANT NEOPLASM OF UNSPECIFIED SITE OF UNSPECIFIED FEMALE BREAST
C25.9 MALIGNANT NEOPLASM OF PANCREAS, UNSPECIFIED
C73 MALIGNANT NEOPLASM OF THYROID GLAND

References and Resources

My Cancer Genome*

A freely available online personalized cancer medicine resource and decision-making tool for physicians, patients, caregivers and researchers that provides information on specific gene mutations.

Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) Genome Browser

COSMIC is an online database designed to store and display somatic mutation information and related details from the vast amount of information available in the published scientific literature about these mutations and their identification in human cancers. The mutation data and associated information is extracted from the primary literature and entered into the COSMIC database.

Genome Browser Gateway from the Genome Bioinformatics Group at the University of California Santa Cruz

The UCSC Human Genome Browser Project is conducted in collaboration with the International Human Genome Project, working with many collaborators at other institutions to produce and annotate the reference sequence of the human genome.

Oncolink

The Abramson Cancer Center hosts the award-winning, first cancer resource on the World Wide Web. Oncolink continues to provide comprehensive information on cancer, cancer treatment options, advances in cancer research, continuing medical education programs, cancer prevention resources, and clinical trial listings.

*My Cancer Genome is a website managed by the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center which gives users up-to-date information on what mutations are present in cancers and the related therapeutic implications. This site also links to available clinical trials for mutations featured. Learn more at: http://www.mycancergenome.org/

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