News Release

PHILADELPHIA— James C. Gee, PhD, an associate professor of Radiologic Science and director of the Penn Image Computing and Science Laboratory in the department of Radiology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has been inducted into the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) College of Fellows.

Gee was nominated, reviewed, and elected by peers and members of the College of Fellows for outstanding contributions to advanced medical image registration and analysis methods.

Election to the AIMBE College of Fellows is among the highest professional distinctions accorded to a medical and biological engineer. The College of Fellows is comprised of the top two percent of medical and biological engineers. College membership honors those who have made outstanding contributions to "engineering and medicine research, practice, or education” and to "the pioneering of new and developing fields of technology, making major advancements in traditional fields of medical and biological engineering, or developing/implementing innovative approaches to bioengineering education."

Gee's research focuses on biomedical image analysis and computing. Last October, he received two NIG grants totaling $3.9 million to develop a first-ever three-dimensional, cellular-resolution digital atlas of  brain cell types in collaboration with colleagues from the Allen Institute for Brain Science, MIT, Harvard, and University of California, San Diego. The atlas will include location, structure, function, molecular properties, and connectedness to other cells to classify and catalogue the diversity of cell types in the brain to improve research and treatment for a range of neurological conditions.

Gee earned bachelor of science degrees in electrical engineering and  computer science, and a master of science in electrical engineering from the University of Washington, and a doctorate in computer and information science from Penn.  

A formal induction ceremony was held during the AIMBE Annual Meeting at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC on April 9, 2018. Gee was inducted along with 156 colleagues who make up the AIMBE College of Fellows Class of 2018.

Penn Medicine is one of the world’s leading academic medical centers, dedicated to the related missions of medical education, biomedical research, and excellence in patient care. Penn Medicine consists of the Raymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania (founded in 1765 as the nation’s first medical school) and the University of Pennsylvania Health System, which together form a $8.6 billion enterprise.

The Perelman School of Medicine has been ranked among the top medical schools in the United States for more than 20 years, according to U.S. News & World Report's survey of research-oriented medical schools. The School is consistently among the nation's top recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health, with $494 million awarded in the 2019 fiscal year.

The University of Pennsylvania Health System’s patient care facilities include: the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Penn Presbyterian Medical Center—which are recognized as one of the nation’s top “Honor Roll” hospitals by U.S. News & World Report—Chester County Hospital; Lancaster General Health; Penn Medicine Princeton Health; and Pennsylvania Hospital, the nation’s first hospital, founded in 1751. Additional facilities and enterprises include Good Shepherd Penn Partners, Penn Medicine at Home, Lancaster Behavioral Health Hospital, and Princeton House Behavioral Health, among others.

Penn Medicine is powered by a talented and dedicated workforce of more than 43,900 people. The organization also has alliances with top community health systems across both Southeastern Pennsylvania and Southern New Jersey, creating more options for patients no matter where they live.

Penn Medicine is committed to improving lives and health through a variety of community-based programs and activities. In fiscal year 2019, Penn Medicine provided more than $583 million to benefit our community.

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