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Preemies 4 Prevention

Wanting to make a difference in the lives of other premature babies and families struggling to deal with the effects of prematurity, this month, two teens born prematurely will launch an initiative to help put an end to the leading cause of death in newborns.

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    Preemies 4 Prevention

    November 17, 2017

    Wanting to make a difference in the lives of other premature babies and families struggling to deal with the effects of prematurity, this month, two teens born prematurely will launch an initiative to help put an end to the leading cause of death in newborns.

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    Birthing New Findings

    November 15, 2017

    A team led by Penn Medicine’s Mary Regina Boland, PhD, an assistant professor of Informatics in Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics, looked at previously documented associations between specific diseases and being born at a certain time of the year, probing deeper to pinpoint the links between them.

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    Surviving the “Silent Killer”: How Seamless Coordination Saves Lives

    November 13, 2017

    As temperatures drop, the number of visits to emergency rooms across the country tends to spike in the opposite direction. From tumbles off of ladders while decorating and holiday baking burns, to icy falls and omnipresent flu germs, the “most wonderful time of the year” doesn’t always live up to its moniker. Yet, there’s one seasonal threat that we tend to forget about until a tragic story hits the news: carbon monoxide (CO), often dubbed the “invisible killer” or “silent killer.” 

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    Smoking and Vaping: Cessation and Prevention in the Modern Era

    November 10, 2017

    Even though overall smoking numbers have declined, Penn's Susan Pizzi worries that millennials and teens are being enticed into the smoking culture through the modern technology of e-cigarettes, which are not yet regulated by the FDA.

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    Good Place to “Hang Out” or Harmful?: The Tumor Microbiome’s Role in Driving Cancer

    November 08, 2017

    Increasing evidence is showing that a dysregulated human microbiome – changes in the diverse population of microorganisms within every person – may play a key role in either setting the stage for some cancers, or even causing them directly.

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Views expressed are those of the author or other attributed individual and do not necessarily represent the official opinion of the related Department(s), University of Pennsylvania Health System (Penn Medicine), or the University of Pennsylvania, unless explicitly stated with the authority to do so.

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