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  • Penn Doctor Receives Prestigious Women in Medicine Award from the Association of American Medical Colleges

    November 30, 2007
    Marjorie Bowman, M.D., M.P.A., received the 2007 individual Association of American Medical Colleges Women in Medicine Leadership Development Award. Dr. Bowman is the Professor and Founding Chair of the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health and Director of the University's Center for Public Health Initiatives at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.
  • Penn Presentations at American Society of Cell Biology Annual Meeting Touch on Cancer, Neurodegenerative Diseases, and Muscular Dystrophy

    November 30, 2007
    Among the 72 posters, lectures, and mini-symposia given by University of Pennsylvania researchers at the ASCB annual meeting are talks that present new research findings on the molecular workings of several types of diseases.
  • Douglas L. Fraker, MD, Appointed to New Position at Penn’s Abramson Cancer Center

    November 29, 2007
    Researchers from the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania announced today that findings from two large, international clinical trials show unprecedented survival for patients with multiple myeloma, a cancer that occurs in the blood-making cells of bone marrow.
  • CT Scans to Determine Heart Disease in the Emergency Room

    November 27, 2007
    In the future, patients who arrive at a hospital Emergency Department complaining of chest pain may be diagnosed with a sophisticated CT scan. If the diagnosis is negative, the patient can go home-and the total time at the hospital will be much shorter than it is today.
  • Penn Research Shows Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Effective in Treating Major Depression

    November 27, 2007
    Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and other study sites have found that transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) - a non-invasive technique that excites neurons in the brain via magnetic pulses passed through the scalp - is a safe and effective, non-drug treatment with minimal side effects for patients with major depression who have tried other treatment options without benefit.
  • Oral Drug Sets New Survival Standard for Bone Marrow Cancer

    November 21, 2007
    Researchers from the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania announced today that findings from two large, international clinical trials show unprecedented survival for patients with multiple myeloma, a cancer that occurs in the blood-making cells of bone marrow.
  • Penn Researchers Use Brain Imaging to Demonstrate How Men and Women Cope Differently Under Stress

    November 20, 2007
    According to a study that appears in the current issue of SCAN (Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience), researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine discuss how men and women differ in their neural responses to psychological stress.
  • Penn Researchers Find Monkeys Able to Fend Off AIDS-like Symptoms with Enhanced HIV Vaccine

    November 20, 2007
    Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have discovered that using an immune system gene to enhance a vaccine used to study HIV in macaque monkeys provides the animals with greater protection against simian HIV (SHIV) than an unmodified vaccine.
  • Fetching New Approaches to Cancer Treatment

    November 16, 2007
    Family dogs that have cancer are being sent into remission by combining conventional chemotherapy with a novel therapy based on revving up the patient's own immune system.
  • Penn Researchers Discover a Mechanism to Explain Biological “Cross-Talk” Between 24-Hour Body Cycle and Metabolism

    November 16, 2007
    It's well known that the body's energy levels cycle on a 24-hour, or circadian, schedule, and that this metabolic process is fueled by oxygen. Now, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have found that a protein called Rev-erb coordinates the daily cycles of oxygen-carrying heme molecules to maintain the body's correct metabolism
  • Three University of Pennsylvania Professors Named 2007 AAAS Fellows

    November 07, 2007
    Three faculty members of the University of Pennsylvania have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).This year AAAS recognized 471 members for their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. The new Fellows will be officially inducted February 16 during the 2008 AAAS annual meeting in Boston.
  • Penn Researchers Find Increase in Disability Among Older, Obese Adults

    November 06, 2007
    Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine report that older adults today are much more likely to suffer from disability than those 10 years ago. This research, the first to track effects of obesity on disability over time, appears in the November 7th issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.
  • Do Women Fare Worse with Some Heart Devices?

    November 05, 2007
    A new study led by cardiologists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine suggests that women with ICDs fare less well than their male counterparts.
  • Milestones in Lung Transplantation

    November 02, 2007
    The PENN Lung Transplant Program is among the most active in the country and remains the premier center in the Philadelphia region. Sustaining superior transplant outcomes, even in patients deemed to be too "high risk" at other centers, is the hallmark of the success over the past decade.
  • University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Study Shows Significant Differences in English- and Spanish-speakers Use of Oncology Websites

    November 01, 2007
    A new study lead by James M. Metz, M.D. , radiation oncologist at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and presented by Charles Simone II, M.D., radiation oncologist at the National Cancer Institute concluded that when it comes to seeking information on the Internet about their health care, Spanish-speaking oncology patients differ from English-speaking patients with regards to both frequency of use and such variables as time of Internet use, browsing patterns, and types of cancer searched.
  • A Missed Shot: The Failure of HPV Vaccination State Requirements

    November 01, 2007
    Penn experts discuss strategies for future and long-term success with vaccination for human papillomavirus (HPV).
  • Thursday 11/1/07: New Frontiers in Diabetes: Integrating Scientific Advances with Patient Care

    October 31, 2007
    Join us for an evening with the leading diabetes physicians and researchers, featuring an informal panel discussion about living with diabetes today and what we can expect in the ongoing battle against it.
  • PENN Medicine Media Seminar Series

    October 29, 2007
    Invitation to Cover: PENN Medicine Media Seminar Series
  • Media Advisory: Penn Physicians Offer Free Vascular Screening

    October 25, 2007
    Join residents of the greater Philadelphia community as they participate in a screening for vascular diseases like peripheral artery disease (P.A.D.), stroke and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA).
  • Penn Receives Over $5 Million to Establish Center for Excellence in Ethical, Legal and Social Implications Research

    October 25, 2007
    A new Center for Excellence in Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) Research has been established at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, a collaboration with the Schools of Nursing and Arts and Sciences, the Wharton School and the Annenberg School for Communication.
  • University of Pennsylvania Receives $4 Million for Center for Education and Research on Therapeutics

    October 24, 2007
    The University of Pennsylvania Center for Education and Research on Therapeutics (Penn CERT) will receive $4 million over the next four years to continue and expand its work on improving the use of therapies for infections.
  • Penn Researchers Find Emotional Well-being Has No Influence on Cancer Survival

    October 22, 2007
    Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have found that emotional well-being is not an independent factor affecting the prognosis of patients with head and neck cancers.
  • Tonight: Penn Pioneers in Pain Medicine Receive National Pain Foundation Award

    October 18, 2007
    The Penn Autism Network, in conjunction with the PA Department of Public Welfare, Bureau of Autism Services, will hold a workshop on learning appropriate sexual behaviors for adolescents, young adults, and older adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD).
  • Healthy Sexuality: Adaptive Skills for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    October 16, 2007
    The Penn Autism Network, in conjunction with the PA Department of Public Welfare, Bureau of Autism Services, will hold a workshop on learning appropriate sexual behaviors for adolescents, young adults, and older adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD).
  • Penn Physicians Offer Free Vascular Screening Learn if You are at Risk

    October 11, 2007
    Are you considered middle age-and do your legs hurt when you walk? If so, it may be time to get screened for a vascular condition.
  • Penn Study Suggests Professional Welders at Risk for Loss of Sense of Smell

    October 11, 2007
    Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have found that professional welders who work in enclosed spaces with poor ventilation may be at risk for loss of sense of smell.
  • Four Penn School of Medicine Faculty Named to Institute of Medicine

    October 10, 2007
    Four professors at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine were elected this week as members of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), one of the nation's highest honors in biomedicine. The new members bring Penn's total to 61, out of over 1600 worldwide. Overall, the IOM named 65 new members this year.
  • Penn Awarded NIH Grant to Study Cardiovascular Disease Management

    October 10, 2007
    Cardiac researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have received a $2.1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to pioneer studies in cardiovascular disease management and participate in a novel collaboration network to develop and implement research in this critically important field.
  • Model to Study Age-Related Macular Degeneration Could Pave Way for Better Treatment

    October 09, 2007
    In the first clinical trial of its kind, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and the Abramson Cancer Center will lead a nationwide test of anti-cancer drug combinations that target blood vessel growth in patients with advanced kidney cancer. The trial is being conducted with colleagues in the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group, a network of researchers, physicians, and health care professionals at public and private institutions.
  • An AIDS-Related Virus Reveals More Ways to Cause Cancer, Penn Researchers Find

    October 08, 2007
    Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have shed new light on how Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpes Virus (KSHV) subverts normal cell machinery to cause cancer. A KSHV protein called latency-associated nuclear antigen, LANA for short, helps the virus hide out from the immune system in infected cells. When LANA takes the place of other proteins that control cell growth, it can cause uncontrolled cell replication.
  • Nation’s First Cancer Trial Combining Multiple Drugs to Attack Blood Vessel Formation in Patients with Kidney Cancer

    October 03, 2007
    In the first clinical trial of its kind, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and the Abramson Cancer Center will lead a nationwide test of anti-cancer drug combinations that target blood vessel growth in patients with advanced kidney cancer. The trial is being conducted with colleagues in the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group, a network of researchers, physicians, and health care professionals at public and private institutions.
  • Penn Biochemist Receives NIH New Innovator’s Award

    October 03, 2007
    James Shorter, PhD, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, has been named an inaugural recipient of the 2007 NIH Director's New Innovator Award. This highly prestigious award totals $1.5 million in direct costs over five years to each of 29 investigators, many of whom are in the early stages of their careers. More than 2,100 applications were received for this extremely competitive program.
  • The Weight is Over: Newly-Launched Penn Weight Management Program Opens Its Doors

    October 02, 2007
    A family affected by multiple myeloma will visit the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania as part of its cross-country jaunt to raise awareness of this form of cancer. Myeloma, also called multiple myeloma, affects the production of red cells, white cells, and stem cells and is the second most common of the blood cancers affecting an estimated 75,000 people worldwide.
  • The Benefits of 'Not Checking the Box:' Default Options Should be Used to Improve Health Care

    October 01, 2007
    In an opinion article in the September 28 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, lead author Scott D. Halpern, M.D., a fellow in the division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine in the University of Pennsylvania Health System, and colleagues, argue that these concepts applied by marketers should also be used by the medical community to benefit patients. Additional authors are Peter A. Ubel, M.D., and David A. Asch, M.D., M.B.A.
  • Setting Sights on Healthy Vision this School Year

    September 18, 2007
    As the school year gets underway, common back-to-school activities like reading the blackboard and completing homework assignments may reveal children's vision problems. ''Good vision is essential for proper physical development and educational progress in growing children,'' says Brian Forbes, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Dr. Forbes offers the following advice on preventing, identifying, and correcting children's vision problems.
  • Unanticipated Consequences of Health Care Information Technology

    September 17, 2007
    Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) have developed a framework to help hospital managers, physicians, and nurses handle the tough challenges of implementing health information technology (HIT) by directly addressing the unintended consequences that undermine safety and quality.
  • Penn School of Medicine Receives $2.3 Million to Study Biological Indicators of Exposure to Cigarette Smoke

    September 14, 2007
    The Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology (CEET) at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine has been awarded $2.3 million over the next four years to study biological indicators of exposure to cigarette smoke. The grant is part of the National Institutes of Health new Genes, Environment, and Health Initiative (GEI). The GEI represents a unique collaboration between geneticists and environmental health scientists. In this first round of awards genetic studies were funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute and biomarker studies were funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.
  • Epidemiologist Brian Strom MD, MPH, Appointed to Two New Positions at the University of Pennsylvania

    September 13, 2007
    Brian Strom, MD, MPH, George S. Pepper Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Chair of the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, and Director of the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, has been additionally appointed to the newly created positions of Vice Dean for Institutional Affairs in the School of Medicine and Senior Advisor to the Provost for Global Health Initiatives.
  • Pair of Penn Studies Find Residency Requirements Have Different Effects on Patient Mortality

    September 04, 2007
    Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have found that new national regulations greatly limiting work hours for physicians-in-training did not lead to increased patient deaths. Analyzing over 8 million patient hospitalizations in the Medicare system and over 300,000 hospitalizations in the United States Veterans Affairs (VA) System, the Penn investigators found that duty hour regulations for medical residents in the VA System significantly improved patient mortality; yet these regulations were not associated with either significant worsening or improvement in mortality for Medicare patients. They report their findings in two studies in the September 5th issue of JAMA.
  • Penn Researchers Discover New Mechanism for Viral Replication

    August 15, 2007
    Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have identified a new strategy that Kaposi's Sarcoma Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) uses to dupe infected cells into replicating its viral genome. This allows the virus to remain virtually undetected by the body's immune system. Previous work suggested KSHV needed viral proteins to initiate replication, but this is the first study to directly show that a section of viral DNA can independently draw upon proteins within a host cell to promote its own replication. The study was published in the August issue of Cell Host and Microbe.
  • Penn Researchers Find Diabetes Drug Kills Some Cancer Cells

    August 13, 2007
    Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have found that a commonly prescribed diabetes drug kills tumor cells that lack a key regulatory gene called p53. Results from current studies in mice may result in new therapies for a subset of human cancers that tend to be aggressive and resistant to existing treatments. Additionally, the findings open up a new avenue for targeting cancers whose hallmark is the absence of this regulatory gene. The Penn team reported their findings last month in Cancer Research.
  • “Myeloma Mobile” Rolls into Philly: Family Cross-country Road Trip

    August 10, 2007
    A family affected by multiple myeloma will visit the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania as part of its cross-country jaunt to raise awareness of this form of cancer. Myeloma, also called multiple myeloma, affects the production of red cells, white cells, and stem cells and is the second most common of the blood cancers affecting an estimated 75,000 people worldwide.
  • Penn Study Finds Pro-Death Proteins Required to Regulate Healthy Immune Function

    August 10, 2007
    Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have found that proteins known to promote cell death are also necessary for the maturation and proliferation of immune cells. Activation of T-cell receptors on the surface of lymphocytes by foreign antigens initiate a calcium-mediated signaling pathway that ends in cell differentiation and growth. The Penn scientists discovered that in the cells that lack the pro-death proteins Bax and Bak, calcium signaling is disrupted and energy production is reduced. Restoration of Bax corrects the signaling problems, increases energy production, and stimulates cell division.
  • White Coat Signifies Beginning of Medical Career for New Doctors

    August 09, 2007
    The 153 members of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine's entering class of 2007, hailing from 31 states and 54 colleges from around the county, will be presented with the traditional 'white coat' and recite the Hippocratic Oath to mark the official beginning of their medical careers.
  • Penn Researchers Discover Novel Pathway for Increasing “Good” Cholesterol

    August 08, 2007
    Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have discovered that a group of liver enzymes called proprotein convertases (PCs) may be the key to raising levels of good cholesterol (HDL-C). The pathway by which these proteins are able to achieve an increase in HDL cholesterol involves another enzyme that normally degrades HDL-C, and was also discovered at Penn. The newly recognized relationship between these enzymes and cholesterol represents another target for ultimately controlling good cholesterol. The study appears in the current issue of Cell Metabolism.
  • Penn Researchers Discover How Key Protein Stops Inflammation

    August 07, 2007
    Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine recently identified how a regulatory protein called Bcl-3 helps to control the body's inflammation response to infection by interfering a critical biochemical process called ubiquitination. While previous studies suggested Bcl-3 plays a role in immunity, this is the first report that Bcl-3 regulates inflammation by blocking ubiquitination. Their findings, published in Science, open new avenues of exploration for developing therapies to treat infectious or inflammatory diseases, such as sepsis, diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Michael Soisson Named Executive Director of Good Shepherd Penn Partners

    August 06, 2007
    Good Shepherd Penn Partners (GSPP), a joint venture of Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Network and the University of Pennsylvania Health System, has named Michael J. Soisson as Executive Director.
  • Study Investigating Vaccine to Treat Brain Tumors Underway at Penn

    August 02, 2007
    Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and the Abramson Cancer Center have begun ACT III - a Phase II/III Randomized Study - to investigate the addition of CDX-110 vaccine to standard care maintenance chemotherapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive form of primary brain tumor.
  • Penn Researchers Discover Pathway that Eliminates Genetic Defects in Red Blood Cells

    August 01, 2007
    Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have discovered a unique molecular pathway that detects and selectively eliminates defective messenger RNAs from red blood cells. Other such pathways -- known as surveillance pathways -- operate in a more general way, in many cell types. Knowing how this specific surveillance system works can help researchers better understand hereditary diseases, in this case, thalassemia, a form of anemia, which is the most common genetic disorder worldwide. The results appear in the most recent issue of Nature Structural and Molecular Biology.
  • Proceeds from Televised Fundraiser to Benefit in the Fight Against Breast Cancer

    July 30, 2007
    With thousands of shoes at half the suggested retail price, shoe lovers had the opportunity to splurge in the name of charity at the 13th Annual QVC Presents 'FFANY Shoes on Sale' event during Breast Cancer Awareness Month last October. The Rena Rowan Breast Center of the University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center (ACC) was one of the beneficiaries of the televised fundraiser that supports breast cancer research and patient education.
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