News Blog

Blog Topic: Neurology

  • migraine

    Medicating for Migraines

    September 13, 2017

    In part one of this post, we talked about the nature of migraines — where they come from, and what models physicians are using to approach them. In this part, we look at the complexities inherent to medicating something that’s such a moving target.

  • connectome

    Using Data to Map the Human Brain

    August 14, 2017

    In 2009, the NIH awarded The Human Connectome Project to prominent researchers help them collect detailed imaging data to map connections in the human brain along with extensive behavioral and heritability measures. Researchers are using this archived, freely available data to better understand how the normal human brain processes functions like reason, memory, and emotion.

  • migraine

    Modeling Migraines

    July 24, 2017

    There are still questions waiting to be answered about exactly how and why migraines are generated: What are these things? Why are they so difficult to treat? Why are they different for everybody? Research is ongoing, though, and several different models are helping physicians shed new light on what makes migraines tick — which could, in turn, lead to new and more effective treatment options down the line.

  • books

    Rare 19th Century Notebooks Reveal New Lessons in Neurology

    April 21, 2017

    The crinkly pages filled with elegant script, a dispatch from the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania’s Dispensary in the late 19th century, are a window into medical history. Geoffrey Aguirre, MD, PhD, an associate professor of Neurology, recently received the notebooks after they were discovered by a colleague. Now, they’re getting fresh life as an official Penn historical artifact.

  • meili

    Mind Your Brain: Closing the Gap for Brain Injury Survivors

    March 20, 2017

    In 1989, Trisha Meili was viciously attacked, leaving her with a severe traumatic brain injury. Doctors didn’t think she’d survive. But Meili did more than survive: She thrived. What kept her going is part of the message she’ll share with attendees at this week’s annual Mind Your Brain @ Penn Medicine conference, all of whom are brain injury survivors, families, and caretakers.

  • jensen teaser

    Putting the ‘Plastic’ in ‘Synaptic Plasticity’

    March 03, 2017

    We’ve all seen 'em: Children displaying prowess far beyond ours in areas we considered ourselves capable. They make up for a lack of experience with the ability to learn at an extraordinary pace, surpassing their elders quickly. You may be relieved to know there’s a term, and full scientific explanation, for this phenomenon—beyond just your being out of touch.

  • orch_teaser

    Playing an Instrument: Better for Your Brain than Just Listening

    January 30, 2017

    While research has long suggested listening to an orchestra’s performance of such well-known pieces as Beethoven’s 5th Symphony and Mozart’s Marriage of Figaro may boost the audience’s brain power – a hypothesis aptly named The Mozart Effect—Penn Medicine experts suggest those playing in the orchestra may derive the most benefits of all.

  • podcast_tease

    Getting a Medical Education from Your Headphones

    January 20, 2017

    Stacks of textbooks and medical journals may soon go the way of the Dodo for many physicians looking to stay updated on latest medical research and breakthroughs. Digital learning tools, such as podcasts, are the way of the future—at least, according to Penn Medicine resident physician in Neurology, James Siegler, MD.

  • Scaling a Tall Peak

    August 12, 2016

    In June, the world mourned the loss of American boxing great Muhammad Ali, who long suffered the effects of Parkinson’s disease (PD). While too late for Ali, the Penn community of clinicians and researchers are hard at work finding new ways to detect the disease so that the next generation...

  • Getting our Heads Around Talking about Alzheimer’s

    June 24, 2016

    A missed credit card payment. Forgetting why you entered a room. Misplacing your keys. Not being able to remember someone’s name. Sound familiar? Probably. Reason for alarm? Probably not. These types of “slips” typically fall into the category of normal cognitive decline. Cognitive abilities are the mental skills you need...

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Views expressed are those of the author or other attributed individual and do not necessarily represent the official opinion of the related Department(s), University of Pennsylvania Health System (Penn Medicine), or the University of Pennsylvania, unless explicitly stated with the authority to do so.

Health information is provided for educational purposes and should not be used as a source of personal medical advice.

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