Hair transplantation is the only thoroughly proven way to permanently restore hair to thinning or bald areas of your scalp. The type of hair replacement surgery chosen depends on the extent and pattern of hair loss, along with your individual situation, lifestyle and desires.

What is hair transplantation?

Hair transplantation is the only thoroughly proven way to permanently restore hair to thinning or bald areas of your scalp. When you have hair grafted from the back and sides of your scalp to your balding areas, your hair will begin growing, and can keep growing, throughout your life.

A combination of hair restoration techniques may be used to produce the best results. The type of hair replacement surgery chosen depends on the extent and pattern of hair loss, along with your individual situation, lifestyle and desires.

What To Expect

Micrografts leave virtually no scaring. They also conserve much of the hair that will be needed for future transplantations. The amount of coverage that is achieved depends on the extent of your hair loss, the density of your donor hair, as well as the number of procedures.

Much of the transplanted hair will shed within a month. Approximately three months later (90 to 100 days), new hair starts to grow and continues to grow at a normal rate. About six months after a hair transplant session, the transplanted hairs begin to take on a natural appearance and will continue to grow for a lifetime. The donor site from which the hair was taken shrinks to a small, barely noticeable incision line that is completely hidden in the surrounding hair.

View our online hair transplant gallery of before and after pictures.

Risks and Outcomes

As with all surgical procedures, there is always some risk. However, complications from the surgical treatment of hair loss are rare and generally minimal. Bleeding and/or infection are infrequent and minor. In general you should avoid aspirin or certain drugs or some herbal remedies before surgery. If you have specific concerns please discuss them with your physician.

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