Staying Safe in the Sun After Transplant

Older lady wearing hat and sunglasses at the beach

Penn Transplant and Penn Dermatology remind you to continue to think of the skin you are in – regardless of the season. Because early intervention for any skin abnormality is the best way to minimize problems, it’s important for everyone to stay vigilant about skin health. For transplant recipients, not only is it important, it’s critical to take skin health seriously and to partner with your healthcare providers to protect yourself. You should take every step you can to minimize your risk.

The reason that careful attention to skin is so serious for transplant patients is because some of the medications prescribed to protect transplanted organs increase your risk for developing skin cancer. This is particularly true for anyone who has ever had sunburn. While people with fair skin and light colored eyes are at a higher risk, even those with darker skin tones are vulnerable to skin cancer, so it’s important to take an active role in this part of your healthcare by practicing early detection and skin cancer prevention.

How to protect yourself

The good news is that it’s easy to do self exams and protect yourself from the sun all year long. If self exams for skin cancer are new to you, the American Academy of Dermatology (ADA) offers an informative three-minute video explaining the steps of an effective self exam and what specifically to look for. Another helpful tool from the ADA is a free download called the Body Mole Map – a way to record moles and track any changes you observe.

Protecting yourself from the sun throughout the year is also easy to add into your daily routine. By simply wearing protective clothing, such as a wide-brimmed hat and long sleeves, and applying sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or above, you can protect your skin from sun-related skin damage.

In addition to these sun smarts, we strongly encourages you to see a dermatologist within the first six months following your transplant and once a year after the initial appointment. A dermatologist is specially trained to evaluate and treat disorders of the skin, including infections, rashes and skin cancer. Penn dermatologists offer special expertise in treating post-transplant patients and managing their increased risks.

If you would like to see a Penn dermatologist who specializes in caring for transplant patients, please call 215-662-2737 for an appointment.

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The Penn Medicine Transplant blog features short postings with news about the transplant program at Penn Medicine, notices about upcoming events and health information. Subscribe to the blog and stay connected with Penn's Transplant Program!

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