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Heart Attacks in Women

Woman smiling

Heart disease is not only a man’s disease. Approximately one woman dies of heart disease every minute, and more women lose their lives to heart disease than all forms of cancer combined.

Over the past few years, the causes and symptoms of heart disease in women have been closely studied. Researchers are finding that not only are symptoms different than those seen in men, but heart attacks undertreated in the female population. While the reason remains to be seen, it is likely that atypical symptoms, the average, younger age women experience a heart attack and hormonal changes during menopause play a role.

So what can women do about it?

Women should feel empowered to take charge of their health. Here are some tools to get you started.

Take action

Start practicing simple, heart healthy habits while you're young and continue throughout your life. This can help reduce the risk for heart disease.

From eating healthy to exercising to calming your mind, following a heart healthy lifestyle sets the tone for your heart story. Control the things that you can control. Stay up-to-date with your doctor appointments and do what you can to minimize your risk. Remember, you can still take action on those risk factors that you can’t control, such as family history.


Download our General Heart Health Guide for more actionable items.

Know the signs of a heart attack

Heart attack symptoms in women can differ significantly from men. The typical scene of someone clutching their chest and falling down does happen, but it doesn’t mean it is the norm for women. Symptoms can begin subtly and may be ignored, so be aware of your body. If something doesn’t feel right or if you feel these symptoms, do not hesitate: call 9-1-1 right away.

Share this infographic with the women in your life, and help a loved one today.


Find out more about your risk for heart disease by speaking with a doctor. Schedule an appointment with a cardiologist today, or call 800-789-7366.

Women and heart disease graphic

About this Blog

The Penn Heart and Vascular blog provides the latest information on heart disease prevention, nutrition and breakthroughs in cardiovascular care.


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