News Blog

Blog Topic: Psychology

  • summer

    Summer Break: Time to Learn or Time to Let Kids Be Kids?

    July 12, 2017

    Summer is becoming a time during which certain children are prone to experience summer learning loss — the loss of academic skills and knowledge over the summer months – and parents are desperately fighting to prevent their children from falling behind. When it comes to keeping their kids academically focused over the summer, Penn Medicine's Martin Franklin says some parents might be overdoing it.

  • penndulum

    Resident Physician Magazine Breaks Silence and Stigma through Creative Expression

    July 07, 2017

    When he was approached by a colleague about writing for a magazine with the theme “unspeakables and ineffables,” Lary Campbell had one idea for a personal essay that kept coming to mind. He had doubts about sharing it, though. The colleague, Lisa Jacobs, knew Campbell was an accomplished playwright and filmmaker who would be a talented contributor to the second issue of the magazine she had founded, Penndulum. She didn’t know that Campbell was HIV positive.

  • alcohol

    Drinking to Blackout: What Happens When Young Brains get Boozed

    June 14, 2017

    Though alcohol has become an integral part of many social functions, especially holidays, few people truly understand the damage that too many drinks can do to your body and your brain. In fact, years of chronic alcohol use can actually contribute to a person developing a serious brain disorder that affects cognition, movement, and memory.

  • pimple

    The Obsession with Pimple-Popping

    June 02, 2017

    There’s no grey area when it comes to the eruption of pimple-popping videos floating around the internet. People either “pore” over them, or burst out in horror just seeing the links. I happen to like them. They’re incredibly grotesque, I admit, but also inexplicably gratifying to me – and many others. That’s why they’re all over YouTube, bubbling up on Facebook feeds, and popping up in news stories.

  • abc

    Facing Our Fears: Why it Works

    May 17, 2017

    Everyone fears something. In fact, it is estimated that more than 19 million Americans suffer from specific phobia. But the things that we fear and the extent to which we fear them can vary greatly from person to person. In his role as the associate director at the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety, David A. Yusko, Psy.D., sees dozens of patients living with a variety of debilitating phobias.

  • 13rw

    "13 Reasons Why" and the Difficult Subject of Teen Suicide

    April 28, 2017

    Netflix's "13 Reasons Why" has received significant attention, not all of it positive, for the graphic way it portrays suicide, sexual assault, and bullying. For Steve Berkowitz, MD, director of the Penn Center for Youth and Family Trauma Response and Recovery, the show fails to adequately handle the subject of teenage suicide in a number of ways — some all too common.

  • drinks

    Effects of Smoking and Alcohol on Smell and Taste (It’s Not What You Think)

    April 10, 2017

    Smoking cigarettes and drinking alcohol can wreak havoc on the organs, but what do these two vices do to the senses? Considering what's known, overdoing it presumably damages a person's sense of smell and taste—however, the work of Richard Doty, PhD, the director of the Penn Smell and Taste Center, along with colleagues at Harvard University, suggests it may be more nuanced.

  • jensen teaser

    Putting the ‘Plastic’ in ‘Synaptic Plasticity’

    March 03, 2017

    We’ve all seen 'em: Children displaying prowess far beyond ours in areas we considered ourselves capable. They make up for a lack of experience with the ability to learn at an extraordinary pace, surpassing their elders quickly. You may be relieved to know there’s a term, and full scientific explanation, for this phenomenon—beyond just your being out of touch.

  • orch_teaser

    Playing an Instrument: Better for Your Brain than Just Listening

    January 30, 2017

    While research has long suggested listening to an orchestra’s performance of such well-known pieces as Beethoven’s 5th Symphony and Mozart’s Marriage of Figaro may boost the audience’s brain power – a hypothesis aptly named The Mozart Effect—Penn Medicine experts suggest those playing in the orchestra may derive the most benefits of all.

  • hiv_twitter_thumb

    Twitter’s Role in the Fight Against HIV

    January 23, 2017

    Twitter isn't just a platform to read news, engage with like-minded individuals, launch insults or give praise. It's also a far-reaching and revealing digital "petri dish" to study human behavior that may help predict disease outbreaks, like HIV, and inform public health efforts, as several studies and social media experts have shown over the last few years.

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Views expressed are those of the author or other attributed individual and do not necessarily represent the official opinion of the related Department(s), University of Pennsylvania Health System (Penn Medicine), or the University of Pennsylvania, unless explicitly stated with the authority to do so.

Health information is provided for educational purposes and should not be used as a source of personal medical advice.

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