News Blog

Blog Topic: Public Health

  • cch-opioid-emergency

    How the Opioid Epidemic is Changing Emergency Care

    December 13, 2017

    Drug overdoses, mostly from opioids, are killing an average of 142 Americans each day. In Chester County, deaths related to opioid overdoses are up 38 percent for the first half of this year compared with 2016. The crisis is affecting both urban and community hospitals alike. Chester County Hospital is taking steps to meet the challenges this crisis presents. 

  • worldaidsday2017

    World AIDS Day 2017: Aging with HIV

    November 27, 2017

    It has been almost 40 years since the world was first introduced to the HIV/AIDs epidemic. Since those early days of confusion and fear, treatment advances have led to a scenario that doctors and patients in the 1980s and early 1990s could not have imagined: the aging HIV patient.

  • volunteer

    An Ounce of Volunteering is Worth A Pound of Cure

    October 27, 2017

    Over the past two years, Jack Sheridan has seen his cardiovascular vital signs – total cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL (the “bad” cholesterol) – decrease dramatically. Yet, during this time, he hasn’t exercised more or changed his diet. His weight has remained the same as have his medications. So what’s his secret? He volunteers.

  • app

    The App Doctors Want You to Delete

    October 06, 2017

    Debbie Cohen, MD, director of the Clinical Hypertension Program at Penn Medicine, doesn’t mince words when talking about the smartphone apps and kiosks in malls and pharmacies that take blood pressure. “People shouldn’t be using them,” said Cohen. “The readings can be completely inaccurate.”

  • socks

    Saving Our Sox for the Homeless

    August 21, 2017

    Anyone who’s ever been a patient in a hospital is most likely familiar with nonslip socks. Some patients take the socks home with them — but, most often, the socks are left behind and then thrown out after just a single wear. A new initiative at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania is slowly changing that scenario, repurposing the socks for the homeless.

  • food bank

    Identifying Food Insecurity, Even in Pennsylvania's Wealthiest County

    July 26, 2017

    Chester County is the wealthiest county among all 67 counties in Pennsylvania — and yet, more than 25,000 county residents received over $3 million in SNAP (food stamp) benefits because they do not have enough money to consistently put food – let alone healthy food – on the table each night.

  • fitbit

    Tracking the Motivational Power of Wearable Technology

    July 14, 2017

    As debate swirls around the utility, necessity and accuracy of fitness trackers - about half of the current wearable-tech market - Penn researchers are examining whether such technologies and other approaches can bring about behavioral changes that improve a patient’s health and well-being.

  • summer

    Summer Break: Time to Learn or Time to Let Kids Be Kids?

    July 12, 2017

    Summer is becoming a time during which certain children are prone to experience summer learning loss — the loss of academic skills and knowledge over the summer months – and parents are desperately fighting to prevent their children from falling behind. When it comes to keeping their kids academically focused over the summer, Penn Medicine's Martin Franklin says some parents might be overdoing it.

  • penndulum

    Resident Physician Magazine Breaks Silence and Stigma through Creative Expression

    July 07, 2017

    When he was approached by a colleague about writing for a magazine with the theme “unspeakables and ineffables,” Lary Campbell had one idea for a personal essay that kept coming to mind. He had doubts about sharing it, though. The colleague, Lisa Jacobs, knew Campbell was an accomplished playwright and filmmaker who would be a talented contributor to the second issue of the magazine she had founded, Penndulum. She didn’t know that Campbell was HIV positive.

  • nudge

    When Push Comes to Nudge

    July 03, 2017

    Imagine if health care costs could be dramatically reduced, and outcomes improved without any heavy lifting – no bills would need to be passed, no policies approved, and no major restructuring required. What if we could simply will people to make decisions that resulted in better care and a healthier population?

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Views expressed are those of the author or other attributed individual and do not necessarily represent the official opinion of the related Department(s), University of Pennsylvania Health System (Penn Medicine), or the University of Pennsylvania, unless explicitly stated with the authority to do so.

Health information is provided for educational purposes and should not be used as a source of personal medical advice.

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