News Blog

Blog Topic: Brain and Behavior

  • PT2

    Addressing the Unseen Scars of a TBI Head On

    March 02, 2018

    Though fractures and other injuries may case aches and pains and damaged ligaments and joints may never be exactly the same as they once were, the scars left by a traumatic brain injury (TBI) often manifest in less visible ways.

  • nfl football earlier deaths

    Uncovering the Long Term Health Impact of Playing in the NFL

    February 02, 2018

    In 1987, NFL players went on strike. Teams scrambled to fill their rosters with “replacement players” with some experience with college or professional football. They became a footnote in sports history, but it turns out these players may actually play a critical role in helping us understand how playing in the NFL affects long-term health.

  • football concussions baltuch

    Concussion Watch: The Eyes on the Sides

    January 31, 2018

    Gordon Baltuch, MD, PhD, spends most of his days performing and teaching others to perform delicate brain procedures like Deep Brain Stimulation and MR-guided Focused Ultrasound. So when the Philadelphia Eagles took on the Minnesota Vikings in the NFC Championship game earlier this month, some were surprised to see Baltuch standing on the field alongside the coaches and players.

  • concussions

    Changing How We Detect and Treat Sport Concussions

    October 23, 2017

    With another season of scholastic football in full swing at school districts across the country, a growing number of physicians and athletic trainers are re-evaluating how they diagnose and treat head injuries suffered during practices and games. 

  • brain1

    Life after Brain Injury

    September 18, 2017

    Every brain injury is different. Traumatic brain injury may result in some physical changes, such as seizures and temporary paralysis, but the majority of the lingering difficulties experienced by brain injury survivors are unnoticeable to the average passerby, often leading to painful and dangerous stigma.

  • migraine

    Modeling Migraines

    July 24, 2017

    There are still questions waiting to be answered about exactly how and why migraines are generated: What are these things? Why are they so difficult to treat? Why are they different for everybody? Research is ongoing, though, and several different models are helping physicians shed new light on what makes migraines tick — which could, in turn, lead to new and more effective treatment options down the line.

  • alcohol

    Drinking to Blackout: What Happens When Young Brains get Boozed

    June 14, 2017

    Though alcohol has become an integral part of many social functions, especially holidays, few people truly understand the damage that too many drinks can do to your body and your brain. In fact, years of chronic alcohol use can actually contribute to a person developing a serious brain disorder that affects cognition, movement, and memory.

  • meili

    Mind Your Brain: Closing the Gap for Brain Injury Survivors

    March 20, 2017

    In 1989, Trisha Meili was viciously attacked, leaving her with a severe traumatic brain injury. Doctors didn’t think she’d survive. But Meili did more than survive: She thrived. What kept her going is part of the message she’ll share with attendees at this week’s annual Mind Your Brain @ Penn Medicine conference, all of whom are brain injury survivors, families, and caretakers.

  • graff1_large

    Guam's Brain Teaser

    March 13, 2017

    I fell down the internet rabbit hole last summer researching my new home, Guam, and came across the disease that mysteriously appeared and then disappeared on the tiny island. The potential culprits behind lytico-bodig included bats, prehistoric palm trees and cursed fruit. Who wouldn’t be intrigued?

  • facebook

    Staying 'Present' in a Smartphone World

    March 06, 2017

    At the beginning of last month, I did the unthinkable and deleted Facebook and Twitter from my trusty iPhone. I found myself increasingly glued to my device, pulling it out every time I was walking to the water cooler or waiting in line to buy lunch. The modern struggle against the smartphone overload is one Penn’s Michael Baime, MD, director of the Penn Program for Mindfulness, is all too familiar with.

About this Blog

This blog is written and produced by Penn Medicine’s Department of Communications. Subscribe to our mailing list to receive an e-mail notification when new content goes live!

Views expressed are those of the author or other attributed individual and do not necessarily represent the official opinion of the related Department(s), University of Pennsylvania Health System (Penn Medicine), or the University of Pennsylvania, unless explicitly stated with the authority to do so.

Health information is provided for educational purposes and should not be used as a source of personal medical advice.

Blog Archives

Go

Author Archives

Go
Share This Page: