The Penn Program for Mindfulness offers Continuing Education (CEs) credits for psychologists, nurses and social workers for some courses.

Continuing Education Credits

The Penn Program for Mindfulness offers Continuing Education Credits (CEs) for individuals working in the healthcare field who wish to learn and use mindfulness-based techniques in their professional or clinical practices. These optional CE credits are available for Psychologists, Nurses and Social Workers for an additional fee for some programs. The total number of credits and the cost varies depending on which eligible CE activity you register for. Click here to view the complete detailed list of CE Learning Objectives.

Psychology

HealthForumOnline is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. HealthForumOnline maintains responsibility for these programs and their content.  For APA credits, attendance at all eight sessions and the All-Day Retreat is REQUIRED in order to receive credit. No partial credit will be provided.

Nursing

Penn Medicine Nursing is an approved provider of continuing nursing education by the Pennsylvania State Nurses Association, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. 

Social Work

The University of Pennsylvania, School of Social Policy & Practice is a pre-approved provider of continuing education credits for Pennsylvania licensed social workers.  Social Workers from states other than Pennsylvania should contact their licensing board to determine whether CEUs granted by the University of Pennsylvania School of Social Policy and Practice are accepted for licensure renewal.

Learning Objectives for Health Forum and Penn Program for Mindfulness Co-Sponsored Programs

In conjunction with Health Forum, The Penn Program for Mindfulness provides CE credits for the courses listed below. Credits are available for Nursing, Social Work and Psychology. Learn more about the relevant Learning Objectives for each CE activity.

Foundation in Mindfulness-based Stress Management

  • Define and identify the 3 basic components of a stress reaction.
  • Discuss the usefulness/purpose of the stress response.
  • Recognize how this hard-wired, automatic feedback loop helps signal alarm and also allows stress to remain long after the triggering thought/event.
  • Distinguish the underlying cognitive components of the stress response and how cognitive distortions or inaccurate thinking may play a role in amplifying the cycle of stress reactivity.
  • Recognize the emotional elements associated with a stress reaction with an increased ability to identify, feel, and tolerate unpleasant, unwanted, or even contradictory, affect.
  • Differentiate the somatic components of a typical stress response and predict common body sensations in response to activation.
  • Identify the ways in which reactivity to stress has the potential to impair both emotional (e.g., acute anxiety, depression) and physical (e.g., blood pressure, impaired immune function) wellbeing for self and others.
  • Explain the concept of mindfulness from a theory- and evidence-based perspective, including its applications in Western culture and healthcare.
  • Apply fundamental strategies from mindfulness-based and other behavioral approaches (e.g., reframing, reassessing, re-evaluating) to help replace "reflexive" judgment and criticism for self and others with greater mental flexibility, curiosity, and dynamic exploration/inquiry.
  • Practice and employ at least 2 mindfulness-based stress management techniques, including "formal" mindfulness meditation, to strengthen purposeful attention, reduce susceptibility to automatic negative thoughts and affect, and promote emotional regulation and relaxation.
  • Establish at least two "informal" ongoing awareness practices (e.g., mindful listening, mindful speaking or mindfulness in any other real life application) to promote the maintenance of purposeful attention and the ability to reserve and/or correct inaccurate/maladaptive thinking; thereby perpetually making room for "new scripts" and potentially healthier choices.
  • Distinguish between an active goal of acceptance of distress (i.e. inviting difficulty) vs. emotional resignation (i.e., staying in hopelessness, resentment) and their relevance to insight, personal growth, and behavior change.
  • Utilize the principles of mindfulness and "listening practices" to enhance effective communication in personal and professional relationships.
  • Apply these collective mindfulness-based techniques toward the establishment and maintenance of goals to manage acute stress & promote long-term coping across a variety of settings.

Healing the Heart and Mind: Mindfulness for Healthcare Professionals

  • Recognize at least 2 ways in which stress impairs healthcare provision, including provider-based (e.g., burnout, myopic focus) and patient-based (e.g., non-adherence, underutilization of services, inefficient use of healthcare encounters) factors.
  • Discuss the usefulness/purpose of the stress response from a biopsychosocial perspective.
  • Distinguish the underlying cognitive components of the stress response and how cognitive distortions or inaccurate thinking may play a role in amplifying the cycle of stress reactivity.
  • Recognize the emotional elements associated with a stress reaction with an increased ability to identify, feel, and tolerate unpleasant, unwanted, or even contradictory, affect – both personally and professionally.
  • Differentiate the somatic components of a typical stress response and predict common body sensations in response to activation.
  • Identify the ways in which reactivity to stress has the potential to impair both emotional (e.g., acute anxiety, depression) and physical (e.g., blood pressure, impaired immune function) wellbeing for patients.
  • Explain the concept of mindfulness from a theory- and evidence-based perspective, including its direct applications in Western medicine to prevent disease and promote health.
  • Apply fundamental strategies from mindfulness-based and other behavioral approaches (e.g., reframing, reassessing, re-evaluating) to help replace "reflexive" judgment and criticism for self and others with greater mental flexibility, curiosity, and dynamic exploration/inquiry.
  • Clinically integrate at least 2 mindfulness-based stress management techniques, including "formal" mindfulness meditation, into health-related interventions to strengthen purposeful attention, reduce susceptibility to automatic negative thoughts and affect, and promote emotional regulation and relaxation among patients.
  • Establish at least two "informal" ongoing awareness practices (e.g., mindful listening, mindful speaking or mindfulness in any other real life application) to promote the maintenance of purposeful attention and the ability to reserve and/or correct inaccurate/maladaptive thinking in the clinical context.
  • Distinguish between an active goal of acceptance of distress (i.e. inviting difficulty) vs. emotional resignation (i.e., staying in hopelessness, resentment) and recognize the relevance of this distinction as it pertains to insight, personal growth, and behavior change among those they care for.
  • Utilize the principles of mindfulness and "listening practices" to enhance effective patient/provider communication, promote therapeutic alliance/connection, and increase overall quality of patient care.
  • Apply these collective mindfulness-based techniques toward the establishment of therapeutic goals and maintenance of treatment plans to manage acute stress & promote long-term coping across a variety of healthcare settings.
  • Identify at least 2 early indicators of provider burnout and employ mindfulness-based skills to facilitate a renewed commitment to the care of and reconnection with patients.

Practicum in Mindfulness-based Stress Management

  • Discuss the usefulness/purpose of the stress response from a biopsychosocial perspective.
  • Distinguish the underlying cognitive components of the stress response and how cognitive distortions or inaccurate thinking may play a role in amplifying the cycle of stress reactivity.
  • Recognize the emotional elements associated with a stress reaction with an increased ability to identify, feel, and tolerate unpleasant, unwanted, or even contradictory, affect – both personally and professionally.
  • Differentiate the somatic components of a typical stress response and predict common body sensations in response to activation.
  • Identify the ways in which reactivity to stress has the potential to impair both emotional (e.g., acute anxiety, depression) and physical (e.g., blood pressure, impaired immune function) wellbeing for patients, as well as providers.
  • Recognize at least 2 ways in which stress negatively influences the patient/provider dyad, including provider-based (e.g., burnout, myopic focus) and patient-based (e.g., non-adherence, underutilization of services, inefficient use of healthcare encounters).
  • Explain the concept of mindfulness from a theory- and evidence-based perspective, including the identification of at least 3 seminal works in the field.
  • Recognize the utility of mindfulness-based interventions in efforts toward personal growth (e.g., increased acceptance/forgiveness for self and others, enhanced sociocultural sensitivity and tolerance, improved interpersonal relationships, anger management).
  • Identify the direct application of mindfulness-based interventions in Western medicine, used alone or in tandem, to reduce the negative health-related consequences of stress (e.g., risk for cardiovascular disease), to enhance adaptation to acute illness (e.g., response to cancer dx), to maintain health-related regimens associated with chronic conditions (e.g., diabetes management), to improve sleep, and/or to reduce the experience of pain.
  • Establish an immersive personal meditative practice consisting of a 40-45 minute meditation daily.
  • Identify at least 2 factors that facilitate the initial learning and uptake of mindfulness-based practices within a clinical context.
  • Recognize, both cognitively and experientially, the common factors that influence the maintenance of a dedicated meditative practice.
  • Design mindfulness-based practices that are targeted and tailored to patients' individual needs (e.g., personal stressors/triggers) and universal themes (e.g., existential issues).
  • Apply fundamental strategies from mindfulness-based and other behavioral approaches (e.g., reframing, reassessing, re-evaluating) to help replace "reflexive" judgment and criticism for self and others.
  • Utilize mindfulness-based practices and strategies to promote greater mental flexibility, increased curiosity, and dynamic exploration/inquiry in patient care directly and indirectly as an active member of an integrative healthcare team.
  • Clinically integrate at least 2 mindfulness-based stress management techniques, including "formal" mindfulness meditation, into health-related interventions to strengthen purposeful attention, reduce susceptibility to automatic negative thoughts and affect, and promote emotional regulation and relaxation among patients.
  • Utilize at least two "informal" ongoing awareness practices (e.g., mindful listening, mindful speaking or mindfulness in any other real life application) to promote the maintenance of purposeful attention and the ability to reserve and/or correct inaccurate/maladaptive thinking in the clinical context.
  • Distinguish between an active goal of acceptance of distress (i.e. inviting difficulty) vs. emotional resignation (i.e., staying in hopelessness, resentment) and recognize the relevance of this distinction as it pertains to insight, personal growth, and behavior change among those they care for.
  • Employ the principles of mindfulness and "listening practices" to enhance effective patient/provider communication, promote therapeutic alliance/connection, and increase overall quality of patient care.
  • Apply these collective mindfulness-based techniques toward the establishment of therapeutic goals and maintenance of treatment plans to manage acute stress & promote long-term coping and health across a variety of healthcare settings.
  • Informally assess and evaluate the relative efficacy of mindfulness-based strategies in their ongoing work with patients.
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