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Uterine Cancer and Endometrial Cancer

About Uterine Cancer and Endometrial Cancer

Patient having a discussion with provider

Uterine cancer is the most common gynecologic cancer in the United States, with more than 65,000 people diagnosed each year. If you’ve been diagnosed with uterine or endometrial cancer, you deserve experienced care and access to the most advanced treatments available.

Penn Medicine's Abramson Cancer Center treats more people with uterine and endometrial cancer than any other center in the region. This high volume means you will receive experienced care from a dedicated team of specialists.

At the Jordan Center for Gynecologic Cancers, part of the Abramson Cancer Center, we are pioneers in gynecologic oncology and have a national reputation for outstanding patient care and innovative uterine and endometrial cancer treatment approaches. U.S. News & World Report consistently ranks the Hospitals of the University of Pennsylvania/Penn Presbyterian among the best in the nation for Gynecology and Cancer care.

What is uterine and endometrial cancer?

Uterine cancer is a disease in which cancer cells form in the tissues of the uterus (womb). There are two primary types of uterine cancer: endometrial cancer, which is more common, and uterine sarcoma, which is rare. In endometrial cancer, cancer cells form in the endometrium, which is the lining of the uterus.

Types of uterine and endometrial cancer

  • Endometrioid adenocarcinoma. This is the most common form of uterine and endometrial cancer. It forms in the glands of the endometrium and varies in severity.
  • Uterine papillary serous carcinoma. This is an aggressive yet more rare form of uterine and endometrial cancer that forms in the lining of the uterus. It tends to return, even when caught early.
  • Uterine clear cell carcinoma. This is an even more rare form, making up fewer than 5 percent of cases.
  • Uterine carcinosarcoma. This is another rare yet typically more aggressive form of uterine and endometrial cancer. It makes up fewer than 5 percent of cases.
  • Uterine sarcoma. Uterine sarcoma develops in the muscle wall of the uterus, also called the myometrium. Fewer than 10 percent of uterine cancer cases are uterine sarcoma. Uterine sarcomas are often more aggressive than other types of uterine cancer.