Rhabdomyosarcoma Risks and Prevention

Risk factors affect the chance of getting rhabdomyosarcoma. Having a risk factor, or even several, does not mean that someone will get cancer. If you feel you are at risk, you may benefit from consulting with a risk assessment specialist within one of Penn Medicine's cancer risk evaluation programs.

Rhabdomyosarcoma Risk Factors

In most cases, there is no known cause for rhabdomyosarcoma. However, there are a few known genetic risk factors for rhabdomyosarcoma. Rhabdomyosarcoma may develop in someone with an inherited disorder that puts them at greater risk. These inherited conditions include:

  • Li-Fraumeni syndrome
  • Pleuropulmonary blastoma
  • Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome
  • Costello syndrome
  • Noonan syndrome

If you feel you are at risk, you may benefit from consulting with a risk assessment specialist within one of Penn Medicine's cancer risk evaluation programs.

Rhabdomyosarcoma Prevention

While it is always good to maintain a healthy weight and to quit smoking or using tobacco, currently, there are no known lifestyle changes that can prevent bone cancer.

Rhabdomyosarcoma Risk Assessment Program

Certain inherited diseases may increase your risk for developing rhabdomyosarcoma.

Genetics is the science that looks at how traits (such as eye color) are passed down from parents to their children through genes. Genetic testing is a process in which the inherited genetic material, called DNA, is carefully tested for alterations. DNA is obtained from a simple blood test. Certain families may benefit from genetic testing.

If you are likely to have an inherited cancer syndrome, you should talk to your doctor about genetic testing. Our cancer risk evaluation programs provide education about the benefits, limitations, and potential drawbacks of genetic testing to help you make the decision that is right for you.