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  • kelly1

    Match Day 2017: How her grandma’s end inspired this young doctor’s new beginning

    March 10, 2017

    Each year, soon-to-be graduating medical students count down to the third Friday in March, also known as “Match Day,” when they find out where they will continue their medical training. Lauren Kelly, a fifth-year MD/MPH candidate in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, describes how caring for her family members informed her own path.

  • nowell teaser

    A Memorial for Peter Nowell, MD

    March 08, 2017

    In the spring of 1938, a teacher at a small progressive grade school in Rose Valley, Pa., wrote of one young pupil: “Might well go far with science.” That child was Peter Nowell, who was honored and celebrated last week at a memorial event held at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania following his death Dec. 26, 2016, at age 88.

  • jason han

    Countdown to Match Day: Jason Han

    March 07, 2017

    Each year, soon-to-be graduating medical students count down to the third Friday in March, also known as “Match Day,” when they find out where they will continue their medical training. Jason Han, a fourth-year student in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania who recently wrote about medical errors from both sides of the stethoscope, shares his story here.

  • facebook

    Staying 'Present' in a Smartphone World

    March 06, 2017

    At the beginning of last month, I did the unthinkable and deleted Facebook and Twitter from my trusty iPhone. I found myself increasingly glued to my device, pulling it out every time I was walking to the water cooler or waiting in line to buy lunch. The modern struggle against the smartphone overload is one Penn’s Michael Baime, MD, director of the Penn Program for Mindfulness, is all too familiar with.

  • jensen teaser

    Putting the ‘Plastic’ in ‘Synaptic Plasticity’

    March 03, 2017

    We’ve all seen 'em: Children displaying prowess far beyond ours in areas we considered ourselves capable. They make up for a lack of experience with the ability to learn at an extraordinary pace, surpassing their elders quickly. You may be relieved to know there’s a term, and full scientific explanation, for this phenomenon—beyond just your being out of touch.

  • marjorie

    Preventing Delirium in the Hospital: Simple Solutions Can Work Best

    March 01, 2017

    Older adults are at extremely high risk of experiencing delirium and functional decline when hospitalized. And it’s easy to see why: Patients are often confined to a bed with a catheter or IV, are sleep deprived, and suffer emotional distress. Now, a partnership between nurses at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and students at Penn’s School of Nursing (SON) is helping these patients get the attention and support they need.

  • pc

    When to Watch: The Complicated Choice of Prostate Cancer

    February 27, 2017

    Understandably, most patients diagnosed with cancer feel the faster they can get treatment, the better. That’s generally true, and the idea of putting off treatment in favor of “keeping an eye” on the disease is counter-intuitive to everything most people believe about cancer. Watching and waiting may seem scarier—but could it be the right move?

  • mobilevan

    Crowdsourcing for CPR

    February 24, 2017

    The chance of a bystander stepping in to perform CPR on someone who goes into cardiac arrest out in public hovers around 40 percent. In Philadelphia, the numbers are far worse. Nonprofits like the American Heart Association are working hard to help turn that around with more CPR outreach, training, and better technological approaches. Yes, there’s an app for it.

  • dickens_medium

    Helen O. Dickens: A Figure Who Was Anything But Hidden

    February 22, 2017

    Helen O. Dickens, was never comfortable being called a trailblazer. For her, it was only ever about achieving her dream. Along the way, however, she left an indelible imprint on her community and played a vital role in transforming women’s health care.

  • epstein_medium

    New Ways on the Horizon to Fix a Broken Heart

    February 20, 2017

    During a heart attack, blocked arteries cause the heart muscle to become starved for oxygen, and eventually some muscle cells die. Many of the more than one million Americans who have heart attacks annually will survive—but the damage done to the heart is permanent, and causes survivors to be at increased risk for further maladies. We need new ways to repair and protect a broken heart.

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This blog is written and produced by Penn Medicine’s Department of Communications. Subscribe to our mailing list to receive an e-mail notification when new content goes live!

Views expressed are those of the author or other attributed individual and do not necessarily represent the official opinion of the related Department(s), University of Pennsylvania Health System (Penn Medicine), or the University of Pennsylvania, unless explicitly stated with the authority to do so.

Health information is provided for educational purposes and should not be used as a source of personal medical advice.

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