The quality of patient care in a hospital is measured differently by various agencies. Here are some of the ways Penn Medicine is measured.
The quality of patient care in a hospital is measured differently by various agencies. These agencies use different definitions, criteria, and metrics and have their own unique methods to compare data. Most of these agencies use information already gathered from sources such as Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and Joint Commission (TJC) to arrive at their own ratings. Therefore comparisons between these agencies can be confusing and data can be misinterpreted. Penn Medicine's strategic priorities are aligned with national benchmarks that are defined by governing bodies such as CMS and TJC. CMS/TJC metrics are created by the National Quality Forum.

In the early 2000s, CMS and the Joint Commission joined forces to develop a national standard for quality care based on a set of processes, or core measures, for hospitals. They established standardized measures of quality in selected patient populations including acute myocardial infarction (heart attack), community acquired pneumonia, congestive heart failure, pregnancy and surgical procedures. Research has shown that following certain steps, such as giving antibiotics to patients before and after surgery, improves patient outcomes. Most of these rating agencies track hospitals' adherence to these processes, which is made available to you, the consumer.

Organizations that Rate Hospitals


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