Minimally Invasive Surgery at Penn Presbyterian
 
About Minimally Invasive Surgery at Penn Presbyterian
What is Minimally Invasive Surgery?
Who is a Candidate?
Types of Minimally Invasive Surgeries

Cardiovascular Surgery

Colorectal Surgery

Gastrointestinal Surgery

Gynecologic Surgery

Thoracic Surgery

Urologic Surgery

Vascular Surgery
 
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Gastrointestinal Surgery

Gastrointestinal minimally invasive surgeries include:

  • Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy - Using small abdominal incisions for access, surgeons use a laparoscope to remove an adrenal gland.
  • Laparoscopic Anti-Reflux - Used to treat Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). Using small abdominal incisions for access, surgeons use a laparoscope to view internal organs and reinforce the valve between the esophagus and the stomach.
  • Laparoscopic Bariatric Surgery - Using small abdominal incisions for access, surgeons use a laparoscope and minimally invasive instruments to create a small stomach pouch and to bypass the remainder of the stomach and a short segment of the small intestine. This operation is performed for the purpose of weight loss.
  • Laparoscopic Colon Resection - Laparoscopic approaches to colon and rectal disease are performed routinely by our surgeons for patients with colon cancer, colon polyps that can not be removed by a colonoscope, diverticulitis, ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Removing the abnormal section of colon with laparoscopic techniques results in less pain, a smaller incision, and a shorter stay in the hospital.
  • Laparoscopic Gallstone Removal - Using the navel and small abdominal incisions for access, surgeons use a laparoscope to view the gallbladder, detach it, deflate it and remove it through the navel.
  • Laparoscopic Myotomy for Achalasia - Using small abdominal incisions for access, surgeons use a laparoscope to view the esophagus and repair the muscle of the lower esophagus.
  • Laparoscopic Removal of Stomach Tumors - Using small abdominal incisions for access, surgeons use a laparoscope to view and remove a tumor.
  • Laparoscopic Spleen Removal - Using small abdominal incisions for access, surgeons use a laparoscope to view the spleen, detach it, place it in a surgical bag and remove it through an incision.
  • Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair - Using small abdominal incisions for access, surgeons use a laparoscope to view internal organs, remove existing scar tissue and place a surgical mesh under the hernia defect and attach it to the strong tissues of the abdominal wall.

Gastrointestinal Surgery
Amy I. Cha, MD, FACS
Sean P. Harbison, MD

See also: Penn Gastroenterology

 


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