Together We Can -- Newsletter of the Joan Karnell Cancer Center
 
 

Archive of Articles

Explore the archive of articles from Together We Can, the official newsletter of the Joan Karnell Cancer Center. Issues are listed in order by date with the most recent editions being shown at the top.

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The Supportive Care Clinic

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Winter 2012 – A cancer diagnosis can be overwhelming. For patients diagnosed with an advanced form of cancer, the issues they face and concerns they have can be particularly challenging. To help patients and their loved ones better cope with an advanced cancer diagnosis, the Joan Karnell Cancer Center developed the Supportive Care Clinic.

CyberKnife® at Pennsylvania Hospital: Targeted, Noninvasive Radiation Therapy

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Fall 2011 - Radiation oncologists have more choices than ever before for treating patients with tumors or cancerous lesions. Penn Medicine offers the full spectrum of these treatment options, including proton therapy, Gamma Knife®, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Now Penn has added CyberKnife® to its treatment options.

The Benefits and Risks of Clinical Trials

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Winter 2011 - Many people may have heard the term "clinical trial," but may not know what the term means or the impact of participating in a clinical trial could have on their health. For cancer patients, clinical trials are studies designed to show how particular treatment strategies can affect the people who receive it, particularly when compared to current, standard therapy.

When "Normal" feels "New"

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Fall 2010 - For some patients, the process of moving from cancer patient to survivor who has completed treatment requires some time to reflect and even grieve the way life was before they were diagnosed.

As part of its ongoing commitment to its patients from the moment of diagnosis to treatment and beyond, the Joan Karnell Cancer Center at Pennsylvania Hospital offers a number of programs and services to help survivors who face psychological, emotional, and medical issues.

Radiation Oncology at Pennsylvania Hospital

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Spring 2010 - "Radiation oncology is one of three ways to treat cancer and all three have different aims," says Dr. Kolker. "Surgery removes a very specific area, chemotherapy treats the cancer with drugs, and radiation can be used for different purposes. Sometimes, we use radiation to help the surgeon, to make the tumor smaller for surgery; sometimes it's a one-two punch with chemotherapy; or it may be radiation alone."

Helping You Cope

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Fall 2009 - As people, we are often reassured by the knowledge that our experiences don’t set us apart from others, that side effects or symptoms we are experiencing are not unusual, and, ultimately, that there are other people who can relate to us. In fact, this type of validation and the sharing of coping techniques are at the heart of the Joan Karnell Cancer Center’s Person-to-Person program.

Cancer and Heart Health

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Spring 2009 - Like all adults, cancer survivors are at risk for heart disease. “Heart health is one of many important aspects of survivorship,”says David Mintzer, MD, chief of thesection of hematology-oncology at Pennsylvania Hospital. “More and more patients survive cancer and our goal is to make sure that people return to the best possible health after their treatment has ended.” Read more.

Demystifying Healthy Eating

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Winter 2009 – If there's one thing you, as a cancer survivor, have in common with the patients down the hall visiting their cardiologists, it's diet—or at least, it should be. A cancer prevention diet is actually the same as a heart healthy diet. In fact, the number one cause of death for breast cancer survivors is heart disease, another excellent reason to take a closer look at the food you eat. Read on...

Care For Life

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Fall 2008 – If you are reading this, you are most likely a cancer survivor or know someone who is. The Joan Karnell Cancer Center at Pennsylvania Hospital considers any patient diagnosed with cancer—whether currently undergoing or having completed treatment—to be a cancer survivor. Read on...

Are You Living Well?

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Spring 2008 – Approximately 60 percent of all cancers occur in patients older than age 65. As the population continues to age and we see increases in the number of people over age 65 and over age 85, the number of older adults receiving cancer care is also expected to increase. Read on...

Additional articles:

Mammography... Making a Difference

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Fall 2007 – In 1977, more than 160,000 women in Sweden were divided into two groups – those that received mammograms every two or three years and those that did not. Seven years later, the physicians administering the study looked at the results. Read on...

Additional articles:

Creating A Healthy Life

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Spring 2007 – Paying attention to your health is the single most important thing you can do because without it, there wouldn’t be anything else. It’s the start of a new year, when people of all ages and with all types of medical histories make a pledge to be healthier. But what does ‘being healthy’ mean? Read on...

Additional articles:

Delivering the Latest Advances in Radiation Therapy

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Fall 2006 – New technologies for radiation therapy are providing patients with certain types of cancer significant improvements in treatment options. More than half of all people diagnosed with cancer use radiation as part of their treatment plan, according to the National Cancer Institute, as high doses of radiation are capable of killing cancer cells. Read on...

Additional articles:

Obtaining the Best Possible Treatment

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Spring 2006 – If you or a loved one is diagnosed with cancer, ask your oncologist about the availability of clinical trials as part of your treatment process. You may be amazed at the benefits. Read on...

Additional articles:

Putting Patients Back in the Center of their Care

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Fall 2005 – The latest computer technology is being used at the Joan Karnell Cancer Center to help patients play a more active role in assessing and managing their symptoms. Read on...

Also in this issue:

A Nutritional Journey

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Summer 2005 – Broccoli vs. brownies? Extra vitamins? Your dietary choices may not be as obvious as you may think. For some cancer patients, a diet that includes healthy food choices such as broccoli or whole grains may be part of the overall plan to help fight cancer. Read on...

Also in this issue:

Bloodless Peripheral Stem Cell Transplant

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Spring 2005 – In 1996, Patricia Ford, MD, a hematologist/oncologist at the Joan Karnell Cancer Center at Pennsylvania Hospital, became one of the first doctors in the country to perform a bloodless peripheral stem cell transplant. Read on...

Also in this issue:

Living Well: A Program to Benefit Older Cancer Patients

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Fall 2004 – Cancer can affect anyone, but cancer can also be survived by anyone, both young and old. Cancer survival stories involving the experiences and struggles of young adults often overshadow the reality that cancer does not only affect the younger population. Read on...

Also in this issue:

Supportive Care Services

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Summer 2004 – The Joan Karnell Cancer Center at Pennsylvania Hospital offers a variety of supportive care services to help patients and their families cope with the physical and emotional challenges of cancer diagnosis and treatment. Read on...

Also in this issue:

Caregivers: Giving/Getting the Care you Need

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Spring 2004 – In the face of cancer, the roles and needs of caregivers should not be overlooked. Caregiving is one of life's most difficult jobs. “It's hard to be a caregiver sometimes,” says Helen Grosky, social worker at the Joan Karnell Cancer Center at Pennsylvania Hospital. Read on...

Also in this issue:

Advancements in Treatment of Breast Cancer

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Fall 2003 – Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in North America and Europe,with more than 200,000 cases of breast cancer diagnosed in the United States in 2001. Researchers and physicians are pushing the forefront of science to discover innovative ways and advancements in treating breast cancer. Two of the latest surgical technologies include lumpectomy with a sentinel node biopsy and skin-sparing mastectomy. Read on...

Also in this issue:

Bloodless Medicine

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Summer 2003 – Once an obscure specialty, bloodless medicine, a service that offers alternatives to blood transfusions, is quickly becoming the latest trend at many hospitals and health systems around the country. The worldwide blood shortage and patients’ fears about the transfer of diseases like AIDS, SARS and West Nile virus have no doubt contributed to this increased interest in bloodless medicine. Read on...

Also in this issue:

Our Focus is on You

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Spring 2003 – You’ve been diagnosed with cancer. Does that mean life should now completely revolve around medication and medical treatment? Not according to the Palliative Care Team at the Joan Karnell Cancer Center at Pennsylvania Hospital. Read on...

Also in this issue:

Sarcoma Researchers Search for Answers

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Winter 2003 – How do tumors develop and progress? That is the question researchers at Pennsylvania Hospital are trying to answer with the help of the GeneChip Microarray Technology from Affymetrix. Purchased with the help of hospital donors, the GeneChip offers a way for researchers to read every single known gene. Read on...

Also in this issue:

Living Full Each Day

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Fall 2002 – It is an honor and a blessing to be here today – to share my experience, strength and hope with you. It's great to be alive! Besides, I love any gathering where you get applause just for having a disease! Read on...

Also in this issue:

With Age, Comes Strength

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Summer 2002 – Cancer: “the Big C.” At one time, older patients who heard that word interpreted it as a death sentence. But not anymore. Research is finding that older adults in some cases actual fare better against the disease than their younger counterparts. Read on...

Also in this issue:

Are Clinical Trials For You?

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Winter 2002 – According to the American Cancer Society, about 1,284,900 new cancer cases will be diagnosed this year. If you are one of these patients, you should be aware of the various treatment options available to you, including clinical trials. Read on...

Also in this issue:

 


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