Search Encyclopedia:    
List of Topics Print This Page
 

Glucose test - urine


Definition:

The glucose urine test measures the amount of sugar (glucose) in a urine sample. The presence of glucose in the urine is called glycosuria or glucosuria.

See also:

Alternative Names:

Urine sugar test; Urine glucose test; Glucosuria test; Glycosuria test

How the test is performed:

A urine sample is needed. For information on collecting a urine sample, see clean catch urine specimen.

Usually, the health care provider checks for glucose in the urine sample using a dipstick made with a color-sensitive pad. The pad contains chemicals that react with glucose. What color the dipstick changes tells the provider how much glucose is in your urine.

How to prepare for the test:

Different drugs can change the result of this test. Make sure your health care provider knows what medications you are taking.

How the test will feel:

The test involves only normal urination, and there is no discomfort.

Why the test is performed:

This test is most commonly used to test for diabetes.

Normal Values:

Glucose is not usually found in urine. If it is, further testing is needed.

Normal glucose range in urine: 0 - 0.8 mmol/l (0 - 15 mg/dL)

The examples above are common measurements for results of these tests. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your doctor about the meaning of your specific test results.

What abnormal results mean:

Greater than normal levels of glucose may occur with:

  • Diabetes, although blood glucose tests are needed to diagnose diabetes. Small increases in urine glucose levels after a large meal are not always a cause for concern.
  • A rare condition in which glucose is released from the kidneys into the urine, even when blood glucose levels are normal (renal glycosuria)
  • Pregnancy -- up to half of women will have glucose in their urine at some point during pregnancy. Glucose in the urine may mean that a woman has gestational diabetes.

Glucose will only show up in the urine once it has reached high levels in the blood. As a result, a glucose urine test is not useful for helping a person monitor and control their diabetes.

What the risks are:

There are no risks.

References:

Landry DW, Bazari H. Approach to the patient with renal disease. In: Goldman L, Ausiello D, eds. Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 116.


Review Date: 9/20/2011
Reviewed By: David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. Copyright 2002 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

   View History
  Glucose test - urine

   
   

 

About UPHS   Contact Us   Site Map   Privacy Statement   Legal Disclaimer   Terms of Use

The University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, PA 1-800-789-PENN © 2014, The Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania