Search Encyclopedia:    
List of Topics Print This Page
 

Heel pain


Alternative Names:

Pain - heel

Home Care:

The following steps may help relieve your heel pain:

  • Rest as much as possible for at least a week.
  • Apply ice to the painful area. Do this at least twice a day for 10 to 15 minutes, more often in the first couple of days.
  • Take acetaminophen or ibuprofen for pain.
  • Wear proper-fitting shoes.
  • A heel cup, felt pads in the heel area, or shoe insert.
  • Night splints.

Other treatments depend on the cause of your heel pain.

Call your health care provider if:

Call your doctor if your heel pain does not get better after 2 - 3 weeks of home treatments. Also call if:

  • Your pain is getting worse despite home treatment
  • Your pain is sudden and severe
  • You have redness or swelling of your heel
  • You cannot put weight on your foot
What to expect at your health care provider's office:

Your doctor will perform a physical exam and ask questions about your medical history and symptoms, such as:

  • Have you had this type of heel pain before?
  • When did your pain begin?
  • Do you have pain upon your first steps in the morning or after your first steps after rest?
  • Is the pain dull and aching or sharp and stabbing?
  • Is it worse after exercise?
  • Is it worse when standing?
  • Did you fall or twist your ankle recently?
  • Are you a runner? If so, how far and how often do you run?
  • Do you walk or stand for long periods of time?
  • What kind of shoes do you wear?
  • Do you have any other symptoms?

Your doctor may order a foot x-ray. Treatment depends on the cause of your foot pain. You may need to see a physical therapist to learn exercises to stretch and strengthen your foot. Your doctor may recommend a night splint to help stretch your foot.

Prevention:

Maintaining flexible and strong muscles in your calves, ankles, and feet can help prevent some types of heel pain. Always stretch and warm-up before exercising.

Wear comfortable, properly fitting shoes with good arch support and cushioning. Make sure there is enough room for your toes.

References:

Wapner KL, Parekh SG. Heel pain. In: DeLee JC, Drez D Jr,Miller MD, eds. DeLee and Drez’s Orthopaedic Sports Medicine. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2009:section F.

Abu-Laban RV, Ho K. Ankle and foot. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosen’s Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2009:chap 55.


Review Date: 1/17/2013
Reviewed By: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. Copyright 2002 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

   View History
  Heel pain

Related Links
Request an Appointment Online or call
1-800-789-PENN (7366)
   
   

 

About UPHS   Contact Us   Site Map   Privacy Statement   Legal Disclaimer   Terms of Use

The University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, PA 1-800-789-PENN © 2014, The Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania