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Aspartic acid


Definition:

Aspartic acid is an nonessential amino acids. "Nonessential" means that our bodies produce it even if we don't get this amino acid from the food we eat.

Aspartic acid is also called asparaginic acid.

Aspartic acid helps every cell in the body work. It plays a role in:

  • Hormone production and release
  • Normal nervous system function

Plant sources of aspartic acid include:

  • Legumes such as soybeans, garbanzo beans, and lentils
  • Peanuts, almonds, walnuts, and flaxseeds

Animal sources include:

  • Beef
  • Eggs
  • Salmon
  • Shrimp
Alternative Names:

Asparaginic acid

References:

Mason JB. Nutritional assessment and management of the malnourished patient. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Sleisenger MH, eds. Sleisenger & Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease. 9th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2010:chap 4.


Review Date: 2/18/2013
Reviewed By: Alison Evert, MS, RD, CDE, Nutritionist, University of Washington Medical Center Diabetes Care Center, Seattle, Washington. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, David R. Eltz, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. Copyright 2002 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

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