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Secondary systemic amyloidosis


Definition:

Secondary systemic amyloidosis is a disorder in which abnormal proteins build up in tissues and organs. Clumps of the abnormal proteins are called amyloid deposits.

Secondary means it occurs because of another disease or situation. For example, this condition usually occurs as a result of chronic infection or chronic inflammatory disease. Primary amyloidosis means there is no disease that is causing the condition.

Systemic means that the disease affects the entire body.

Alternative Names:

Amyloidosis - secondary systemic

Causes:

The exact cause of amyloidosis is unknown. You are more likely to develop secondary systemic amyloidosis if you have a long-term infection or inflammation.

This condition may occur with:

Symptoms:

The symptoms of secondary systemic amyloidosis depend on which body tissue is affected by the protein deposits. These deposits damage normal tissues, leading to the symptoms or signs of this illness:

Exams and Tests:

Tests that may be done include:

Treatment:

The condition that is causing the amyloidosis should be treated. Some persons may need a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. There is no specific treatment for amyloidosis itself.

Outlook (Prognosis):

How well a person does depends on which organs are affected and whether the disease that is causing it can be controlled. If the disease involves the heart and kidneys, it may lead to organ failure and death.

Possible Complications:
When to Contact a Medical Professional:

Call your health care provider if you have symptoms of this condition. The following are serious symptoms that need prompt medical attention:

  • Bleeding
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • Numbness
  • Shortness of breath
  • Swelling
  • Weak grip
Prevention:

If you have a disease that is known to increase your risk of this condition, make sure you get it treated. This may help prevent amyloidosis.

References:

Gertz MA. Amyloidosis. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman’s Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 194.


Review Date: 4/14/2013
Reviewed By: David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. Copyright 2002 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

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