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Prostate cancer


Alternative Names:

Cancer - prostate; Biopsy - prostate; Prostate biopsy; Gleason score

Symptoms:

With early prostate cancer, there are often no symptoms.

The PSA blood test may done to screen men for prostate cancer. Often, PSA level rises before there are any symptoms.

The symptoms listed below can occur with prostate cancer as it grows larger in the prostate. These symptoms can also be caused by other prostate problems:

  • Delayed or slowed start of urinary stream
  • Dribbling or leakage of urine, most often after urinating
  • Slow urinary stream
  • Straining when urinating, or not being able to empty all of the urine
  • Blood in the urine or semen

When the cancer has spread, there may be bone pain or tenderness, most often in the lower back and pelvic bones.

Exams and Tests:

An abnormal digital rectal exam may be the only sign of prostate cancer.

A biopsy is needed to tell if you have prostate cancer. A biopsy is a procedure to remove a sample of tissue from the prostate. The sample is sent to a lab for examination. It will be done in your doctor's office.

Your doctor may recommend a biopsy if:

  • You have a high PSA level
  • A digital rectal exam reveals a hard or uneven surface

The biopsy result is reported using what is called a Gleason grade and a Gleason score.

The Gleason grade tells you how fast the cancer might spread. It grades tumors on a scale of 1 through 5. You may have different grades of cancer in one biopsy sample. The two most common grades are added together. This gives you the Gleason score. The higher your Gleason score, the more likely the cancer can spread beyond the prostate:

  • Scores 2 through 5: Low-grade prostate cancer.
  • Scores 6 through 7: Intermediate- (or in the middle) grade cancer. Most prostate cancers fall into this group.
  • Scores 8 through 10: High-grade cancer.

The following tests may be done to determine whether the cancer has spread:

The PSA blood test will also be used to monitor your cancer after treatment.

Treatment:

Treatment depends on many things, including your Gleason score and your overall health. Your doctor will discuss your treatment options with you.

If the cancer has not spread outside the prostate gland, common treatments include:

If you are older, your doctor may recommend simply monitoring the cancer with PSA tests and biopsies.

Hormone therapy is mainly used for cancer that has spread beyond the prostate. It helps relieve symptoms and prevents further growth and spread of the cancer. But it does not cure the cancer.

If prostate cancer spreads even after hormone therapy, surgery, or radiation has been tried, treatment may include:

  • Chemotherapy
  • Immunotherapy (medicine to trigger the immune system to attack and kill cancer cells)

Surgery, radiation therapy, and hormone therapy can affect your sexual performance. Problems with urine control are possible after surgery and radiation therapy. Discuss your concerns with your health care provider.

After treatment for prostate cancer, you will be closely watched to make sure the cancer does not spread. This involves routine checkups, including PSA blood tests (usually every 3 months to 1 year).

Support Groups:

You can ease the stress of illness by joining a prostate cancer support group. Sharing with others who have common experiences and problems can help you not feel alone.

Outlook (Prognosis):

How well you do depends on whether the cancer has spread outside the prostate gland and how abnormal the cancer cells are (the Gleason score) when you are diagnosed.

A cure is possible if the cancer has not spread. Hormone treatment can improve survival, even if a cure is not possible.

When to Contact a Medical Professional:

Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of PSA screening with your health care provider.

Prevention:

Talk with your provider about possible ways to lower your risk of prostate cancer. These may include lifestyle measures, such as diet and exercise.

There are no medicines approved by the FDA for preventing prostate cancer.

References:

American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. PSA testing for the pretreatment staging and posttreatment management of prostate cancer: 2013 Revision of 2009 Best Practice Statement. Linthicum, MD: American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. 2013. Available at: www.auanet.org/common/pdf/education/clinical-guidance/Prostate-Specific-Antigen.pdf. Accessed October 2, 2015.

Eastham JA, Scardino PT. Expectant management of prostate cancer. In: Wein AJ, Kavoussi LR, Novick AC, Patin AW, Peters CA, eds. Campbell-Walsh Urology. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 101.

Loeb S, Carter HB. Early detection, diagnosis, and staging of prostate cancer. In: Wein AJ, Kavoussi LR, Novick AC, Partin AW, Peters CA, eds. Campbell-Walsh Urology. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 99.

National Cancer Institute: PDQ Prostate Cancer Treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. Date last modified August 7, 2015. Available at: www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/prostate/HealthProfessional. Accessed October 2, 2015.

National Comprehensive Cancer Network. NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines): Prostate cancer. Version 1.2015. Available at: www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/pdf/prostate.pdf. Accessed October 2, 2015.

Nelson WG, Carter HB, DeWeese TL, Eisenberger MA. Prostate cancer. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Dorshow JH, Kastan MB, Tepper JE, eds. Abeloff's Clinical Oncology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2014:chap 84.


Review Date: 8/31/2015
Reviewed By: Jennifer Sobol, DO, urologist at the Michigan Institute of Urology, West Bloomfield, MI. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. Copyright 2002 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

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