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Hyperthyroidism


Alternative Names:

Thyrotoxicosis

Exams and Tests:

The health care provider will do a physical exam. The exam may find the following:

  • High systolic blood pressure (the first number in a blood pressure reading)
  • Increased heart rate
  • Enlarged thyroid gland
  • Shaking of the hands
  • Swelling or inflammation around the eyes

Blood tests are also ordered to measure your thyroid hormones TSH, T3, and T4.

You may also have blood tests to check: 

Treatment:

Treatment depends on the cause and the severity of symptoms. Hyperthyroidism is usually treated with one or more of the following:

  • Antithyroid medications
  • Radioactive iodine to destroy the thyroid gland and stops the excess production of hormones
  • Surgery to remove the thyroid

If your thyroid is removed with surgery or destroyed with radiation, you must take thyroid hormone replacement pills for the rest of your life.

Medicines called beta-blockers may be prescribed to treat symptoms such as fast heart rate, sweating, and anxiety until the hyperthyroidism can be controlled.

Outlook (Prognosis):

Hyperthyroidism is treatable. Some of its causes may go away without treatment.

Hyperthyroidism caused by Graves disease usually gets worse over time. It has many complications, some of which are severe and affect quality of life.

Possible Complications:

Thyroid crisis (storm), also called thyrotoxicosis, is a sudden worsening of hyperthyroidism symptoms that may occur with infection or stress. Fever, decreased alertness, and abdominal pain may occur. Patients need to be treated in the hospital.

Other complications of hyperthyroidism include:

  • Heart problems such as fast heart rate, abnormal heart rhythm, heart failure
  • Osteoporosis

Surgery-related complications, including:

  • Scarring of the neck
  • Hoarseness due to nerve damage to the voice box
  • Low calcium level due to damage to the parathyroid glands (located near the thyroid gland)
  • Hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) 
When to Contact a Medical Professional:

Call your health care provider if you have symptoms of hyperthyroidism. Go to an emergency room or call the local emergency number (such as 911), if you have:

  • Change in consciousness
  • Dizziness
  • Rapid, irregular heartbeat

Call your health care provider if you are being treated for hyperthyroidism and you develop symptoms of underactive thyroid, including:

  • Depression
  • Mental and physical sluggishness
  • Weight gain
References:

Bahn RS, Burch HB, Cooper DS, et al. Hyperthyroidism and other causes of thyrotoxicosis: Management Guidelines of the American Thyroid Association and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. Endocr Pract. 2011;17:457-520.

Mandel SJ, Larsen PR, Davies TF. Thyrotoxicosis. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg HM. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology. 12 ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier Saunders; 2011: chap 12.


Review Date: 6/7/2013
Reviewed By: Brent Wisse, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology & Nutrition, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. Copyright 2002 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

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